Sexual Harassment Archives

The workplace rumor mill and sexual harassment

For anyone assuming HR duties at a business in Arizona, it's important to take reliable complaints about inappropriate workplace behavior seriously. But there's something of a gray area when it comes to tips received from anonymous sources. One situation like this involved an anonymous email expressing concerns about the rapid advancement of a woman rumored to be having off-the-clock relations with the son of the company's CEO, who is also expected to head the company at some point.

Men show declining concern about workplace harassment

Despite the rise of the #MeToo movement drawing attention to the prevalence of workplace sexual harassment in Arizona and across the U.S., men continue to show limited concern about the phenomenon. In fact, U.S. men are reportedly less concerned about harassment in the workplace than they were before the rise of the movement. They also are increasingly likely to believe that others are "too sensitive" about sexual harassment concerns.

Leadership can create a culture against harassment

Research indicates that strong leadership can play a role in reducing sexual harassment in companies both in Arizona and throughout the country. When employees believe that there are consequences for their actions, they are less likely to commit acts of harassment. When they don't believe that there are consequences, they are more likely to commit them. In such cultures, those who engage in sexual harassment tend to be protected while accusers are the ones who are penalized.

Forced arbitration policy ends at Facebook

Arizona residents may use Facebook on a regular basis as a way to stay connected to the world around them. For those who work at the company, they will no longer have to go through private arbitration to resolve sexual harassment cases. This was revealed in a Wall Street Journal report, and the use of private arbitration in such cases is common in the tech industry.

EEOC sexual harassment claims rise during #MeToo era

Arizona residents are likely aware that Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein has been accused of rape and sexual assault by dozens of women including A-list movie stars. The allegations leveled against the disgraced producer were the impetus for the #MeToo movement, which has encouraged thousands of women around the world to step forward and share their stories. The movement has also fueled a surge of sexual harassment in the workplace claims according to the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission.

Arizona workplace harassment often goes unreported

A study published by international specialist insurer Hiscox indicates that 35 percent of employees across the U.S. feel they've been subject to harassment in the workplace. Half of that group said the harassment they experienced was due to their sex or gender. Researchers putting together the 2018 Workplace Harassment Study surveyed 500 full-time employee adults in the U.S.

Former FEMA employee being investigated

FEMA is responsible for helping Arizona residents obtain assistance after a natural disaster or other emergency. The man who ran the organization's personnel department until June 2018 is facing allegations of sexual harassment and that he led a toxic culture. Among the allegations against him is that he hired friends from college and women who he met online for the purposes of having sex with his friends within the organization.

Airlines may soon need to file annual harassment reports

Women in many Arizona industries are concerned about sexual harassment on the job. However, airline and other transportation workers may be particularly worried. For example, one survey found that over 66 percent of flight attendants have experienced sexual harassment on the job, and many flight attendants are seeking greater attention to the issue. Federal lawmakers have proposed a bill that could require airlines and other companies in the transportation business to report on their annual incidents of workplace sexual harassment.

The protections of Title VII do not apply to many.

For more than 50 years, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act has been hailed as a protection for women in the workforce. As a law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex, it has helped many women over the years. But working women in Phoenix, Arizona should know that not all are protected under the Act.

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