civil rights law Archives

Housing discrimination: Frequently asked questions

Discrimination rears its ugly head in countless forms and in many different areas of life. Some employers, for example, refuse to hire people from certain races and backgrounds. Meanwhile, some people simply refuse to make friends with certain individuals based on superficial factors. The problem of discrimination even extends into housing.

Discrimination against older workers still a threat

Many older workers in Arizona may be concerned about the potential of facing age discrimination in the workplace, even when they are employed by well-established corporations. For example, a recent report from ProPublica and Mother Jones magazine revealed extensive allegations of age discrimination at IBM, long a company ostensibly known for long-term careers that honored seniority. In the past five years, however, the corporation may have laid off approximately 20,000 workers aged 40 and up in the United States, although that number is almost certainly an underestimate.

What is your strategy?

God blessed me with the gift of strategy. I first noticed that I strategize one, cold, winter day when mom my dropped me off at school for afternoon kindergarten in Addison, Illinois. I waited for the bell, minding my own business when a boy came up to me to inform me that he planned to hit me with a snowball. Confronted with this minor threat to my well-being being, I immediately developed a strategy. I hoped to deter the boy from putting snow on me by informing him that if he hit me with a snow, I would punch him in the stomach.

Should I hire an employment law lawyer?

If you've been wronged as an employee you might be able to pursue an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) complaint that leads to a lawsuit. If successfully navigated, the suit could bring you just compensation and other remedies relating to the financial, career and emotional damages that you suffered as a result of the wrongdoing.

Large companies may engage in age discrimination

A HubSpot job ad that was run on Facebook in November 2017 targeted individuals between the ages of 27 and 40. However, that may not be the only job ad that older folks in Arizona or elsewhere in America weren't able to see. According to a new report, companies such as Google and even Facebook itself have engaged in similar behavior.

Understanding and recognizing police misconduct and brutality

While the police have the power to carry out the duties of their job, they still must follow the law and proper protocols. Recent studies show that law enforcement is more likely to use excessive force against certain groups. Recognizing police brutality or misconduct lets people protect their rights and stop future abuses. We will go over common civil rights issues and what to do if you believe you have experienced police brutality and/or misconduct.

But there's more to it than that...

Have you ever been to a place of business and received bad service? Sure. It happens everyday. People receive bad service. Big deal. But what happens when it's more than bad service, when you're completely denied service of your physical attributes, one of the reasons protected by law. That still happens even in this day and age.

Identifying casual racism in the workplace

If you've never heard the term "casual racism," you're not alone. Most people are only on the lookout for more overt forms of racism, such as using particular words or phrases or creating policies that very conspicuously privilege one person or population over another.

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